Seaview Gardens, Storytelling

Seaview Gardens Jamaica: The Truth about that City Dump by Denise N. Fyffe

The Truth

Not too many people know about this little known fact; well except for those who drive vehicles and live in Seaview Gardens. Contrary to what you are led to believe, rubbish is burnt on a frequent basis at the Riverton City dump . To the extent that when we wake up in the mornings, the evidence is quite visible on our cars.

Our Experience

In 2015, just before the Kingston, St. Andrew and St. Catherine areas were overwhelmed with smoke and smug from the Riverton City dump; we who live in Seaview Gardens, those who traverse the Spanish Town Road and the surrounding communities, were cocooned by smoke in the night, as we slept. I thank God that I have no serious respiratory ailments, unlike thousands of other Jamaicans; but my one Achilles heel, in that regard, is smoke. It is an ever-present hazard that roams freely through the ghettos of West Kingston.

Nonetheless, I live a life of favour and when I lock my doors at night and half turn the old rotten board windows; God seals me in my 30×15 quad and I am usually not aware of the killer lurking outside my weather proof doors. But when I come out in the morning, habitually a little after six, my little  car is most often dressed in a little slip of ashes. In 2014, that layer was more a thick frock than a light slip. It was the cause of many unfavourable words and mutterings in the morning, as I clean off my car, before driving away to work. It is the root of my frustrations and decisions to not wipe off said car, but leave the devils evidence to the 50 to 60 to 70 km wind shear created by my little cruiser heading to Three Miles.

“Ok so I speed a little, I drive a sporty car that must be given free rein on occasion. But I know; I drive much slower than the cars racing by me at 100 to 120 km. Now back to the ashes…”

On venturing out of my narrow drive way, into the path way, and across the stony open land; I can see the wall of smoke rescinding across the polluted gully to the Riverton dump boundary as the sun rises. My eyes scan the landscape as I drive, heading out to the stoplight at Red Stripe. For sure, my windows would remain rolled up, because the sight before me is threatening and I worry for the school children who missed the 6 o’ clock bus and now stand unaware of the threat to their very lives.

As I traverse east along Spanish Town Road, even before I have completed the Red Stripe stretch, it is obvious the smoke wandered very far in the night; even beyond the Hagley Park Road and Spanish Town road intersection and stoplight. It thins out the further I go like sheet used way beyond its time. But this pestilence, was flaunting itself, like a child sneaking out when the parents are unaware. Except in this case, I believe mommy and daddy are quite aware.

Subsequently, I wasn’t surprised when I came home one night to see the rebellious teenager bellowing over the entire expanse of Riverton City, like a two year old throwing a tantrum. I uttered a prayer to God for His favour and protection, drove across the stony open land, down to the narrow path and back inside my narrow driveway. I retrieved my possessions from the car, opened the door and grill and sealed the entrance to my enclave. This night my old board windows were shut tight and I slept in the arms of God.

A respite did come while the pestilence roamed the land; it was silence. All the care free people of the night had to shut in. There was no loud music, no sounds of dominoes hitting the makeshift table at my neighbour’s gate, no children nosily gallivanting on my neighbour’s roof, using my yard as garbage bin and no children under two running through the pathway with their laughter running even faster. Yes, on these nights when the pestilence sought vengeance and victims, there was quiet.

Copyright © 2015, Denise N. Fyffe

About the writer:
Poetess Denise N. Fyffe has worked in Information Technology positions for fifteen years. She is also a trained counselor and teacher. Meeting the challenges of the recession head on, she transitioned into being a freelance writer.

She has published many books of  including

1 thought on “Seaview Gardens Jamaica: The Truth about that City Dump by Denise N. Fyffe”

  1. Reblogged this on THE ISLAND JOURNAL and commented:
    Not too many people know about this little known fact; well except for those who drive vehicles and live in Seaview Gardens. Contrary to what you are led to believe, rubbish is burnt almost every night at the Riverton City dump. To the extent that when I wake up in the mornings, the evidence is quite visible on my car.

    Like

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